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  • Writer's pictureAtanas Bogoev M.D. and Maria Cholakova

Are You Falling for The Common Myths About Eyes? Get the Real Facts Here

Updated: May 11, 2023

There are many misconceptions and myths about eyes that have been circulating for generations. Unfortunately, many of these misconceptions can lead to misinformation and may prevent individuals from taking proper care of their eyes.


Luckily, Ophthalmology24 is here to get some of the most prevalent eye myths debunked and spit out the real facts, with the help of ophthalmologists and medical research.


Table of Content:


The Eye-Opening Truths: Busting 11 Myths About Eyesight


Ready to learn more about the most common false beliefs and misconceptions about vision and eye health? It's time to separate eye facts and myths.


Don’t believe these myths about eyes:


Myth #1: Sitting too close to the TV or computer screen will damage your eyes

Watching screen up close

Many of us have heard the warning from our parents or teachers that sitting too close to the TV or computer screen will damage our eyes. However, according to ophthalmologists and the American Academy of Ophthalmology, this is a myth.


While prolonged use of electronic devices may cause eye strain and eye fatigue, it is unlikely to cause permanent damage to our eyesight.



Myth #2: Reading in dim light will harm your eyes

Mother reading in dim light

Another myth that has been circulating for years is that reading in dim light will damage your eyes. This statement is certainly not true. Reading in low light may cause eye strain and fatigue, but it will not lead to any permanent damage to your eyesight.


Myth #3: Using someone else's glasses will harm your eyes

Using someone else's glasses will NOT harm your eyes

Some people believe that using someone else's glasses will harm their eyes. Contrary to popular belief, this is not true. While it is not generally recommended to use someone else's glasses as they may not correct your specific vision needs, they are not likely to cause any harm to your eyes.


Myth #4: Wearing glasses or contacts can make your eyes dependent on them

Wearing glasses or contacts can make your eyes dependent on them is not true

Many people believe that wearing glasses or contacts will make their eyes dependent on them and weaken their eyesight. However, this is a myth. Wearing the right corrective lenses will not make your eyesight worse over time. In fact, wearing glasses or contacts according to your prescription can actually improve your vision by correcting your refractive error. The progression of myopia in children, teens, and young adults is explained by spasms of the focusing muscle and the natural growth of the eyeball.



Myth #5: Eye exercises can improve your eyesight

Eye exercises can NOT improve your eyesight

There are many claims that eye exercises can improve your eyesight or prevent the need for glasses or contacts. Yet, there is no scientific evidence to support these claims. While eye exercises may help with eye strain and fatigue, they will not improve your refractive error or correct any underlying eye conditions.


In the ophthalmology field, it is commonly known this is one of the myths about eyes that exist because certain people try to induce a placebo effect using eye exercises.


Myth #6: Crossing your eyes can cause them to get stuck

Crossing your eyes can cause them to get stuck is an eye myth

Crossing your eyes is a temporary muscle contraction that does not cause any permanent damage or harm. It is a common misconception that simply crossing your eyes can cause them to get stuck in that position, but this is just one of the myths about eyes.


Myth #7: Blinking more often will improve your eyesight

Blinking more will NOT improve your eyesight

Some people believe the popular eyes myth which claims that blinking more often will help improve their eyesight. Please note, this is just one of the eyesight myths that have no scientific basis. Blinking often will not correct any underlying eye conditions or improve your refractive error.


Myth #8: Staring at the sun or a solar eclipse can't harm your eyes

Staring at the sun or solar eclipse is dangerous for your eyes

This is one of the disturbing myths about eyes that could actually cause you harm if you believe it. The fact is, staring at the sun or a solar eclipse can cause permanent damage to your eyesight. The intense light is likely to damage the cells in your retina, leading to vision loss or blindness. That is one of the reasons why it is important to wear certified solar eclipse glasses or use solar filters to safely view a solar eclipse.


Myth #9: Eating carrots will improve your eyesight

Eating carrots improves eye health but does not affect the vision

This is one of the most popular myths about eyes! While carrots are a good source of Vitamin A, which is essential for good eye health, they will not improve your eyesight beyond what a balanced diet can do. Overall, eating a healthy diet that includes a variety of fruits and vegetables is important for maintaining good eye health. But it will not improve your eyesight, nor it will fix your nearsightedness or farsightedness.



Myth #10: Contact lenses can get lost behind your eyes

 Contact lenses can NOT get lost behind your eyeballs

Contrary to popular belief, contact lenses can NOT get lost behind your eyes. The conjunctiva, a thin layer of tissue that covers the front of the eye and lines the inside of the eyelids, prevents contact lenses from slipping behind the eyes.


If a contact lens is lost, you can usually find it by blinking or using eye drops and artificial tears. In case that turns out to be a hard task for you, you can go to an eye doctor who can easily take your contact lens out.


Myth #11: Blind people see complete darkness

Blind people do not always see complete darkness

On the topic of common myths about eyes, we should certainly address this misconception. Not all blind people see complete darkness. There are different levels and kinds of blindness. Some blind people may still see light, shapes, or colors. Therefore, it is necessary to recognize and respect the diversity of experiences among blind individuals.


To conclude, there are many misconceptions and myths about eyes that have been spreading for centuries. However, with the help of ophthalmologists and research, we are able to bust these eye myths and provide accurate information about eye health.

Are there any eyes myths and facts we forgot to address in this article? Let us know in the comments!

Our ophthalmologists would respond to your queries and answer all your questions. By commenting, you also genuinely help us expand and improve our content.


Debunking resources are linked and marked in the article.

All medical facts and statements are checked by Atanas Bogoev M.D.

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